Remembering Bapu

  • SumoMe

Non-violence is the one constructive process of nature in the midst of incessant destruction going on about. – M.K.Gandhi In his message to The World Tomorow Dated November 14, 1924.

We are helpless mortals who are involved in some violence – destruction of life while just simply living the lives. Gandhiji considered the rishis who discovered the law of non-violence greater geniuses than Newton. Since human beings have been created by God in his own image; they are to be governed by reason, truth and love rather than by fear and violence.

Non- violence can be considered as a religion not only for the saints but for the common man as well. It means putting one’s whole soul against the will of the tyrant. In its first aspect, Ahimsa signifies a state of harmlessness and in another facet – a state of love, of doing well even to the evil-doer. Gandhiji has very well enumerated that non-violence is a quality of the heart. The correct test to judge violence or non-violence is by referring to the spirit behind the actions in question. In no way, would non-violence mean meek submission to the will of the evil-doer.

Ahimsa and truth are closely intertwined; ahimsa is the means and truth is the end. When a mouse allows a cat to be torn into pieces by her, it is definitely not non-violence. Non- violence was characterized by Bapu as the surest method of discovering the truth. He was of the view that India has a soul that cannot perish and that can rise triumphant above every physical weakness and defy the physical combination of a whole world. He wanted India to practice non-violence because by adopting doctrine of the sword, she would only gain momentary victory. India has to follow inherited principle of ahimsa as it needs to carry a mission to deliver to the world.

P.S. Vijaya Natharaj has remarked that Gandhiji has presented non-violence in a new form and shape before the world; the form of his non-violence is no escape or exile but resistance. In pursuance of a suggestion made in an International Conference on “Peace, Non-Violence, and Empowerment: Gandhian Philosophy in the 21st Century”, January 2007, a resolution was adopted by U.N.on June 15, 2007 declaring October 2, the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, as the “International Day of Non-Violence”.

(The views expressed above are inspired by writings of Mahatma Gandhi.)

Bhumika Sharma

Image Source [http://www.flickr.com/photos/bootbearwdc/114349563/sizes/l/in/photostream/]

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